Victor von Wahl

Victor von Wahl in 1893.

Victor von Wahl (1840-1915) was an Imperial Russian Army general, mayor of St. Petersburg, and governor of Vilnius. He came from Baltic German aristocracy. Von Wahl had also been a director of the Xenia Institute, an exclusive school for aristocratic women.
Von Wahl became the governor of Vilna in the autumn of 1901. In 1902, he ordered the arrest and flogging of a number of Jewish and Polish workers who had taken part in a May Day parade.[1] That same year, a Bundist worker, Hirsh Lekert, unsuccessfully attempted to assassinate him, wounding him in the leg and arm. Lekert was tried by military court, sentenced to death and executed.
Von Wahl became a member of the State Council in 1903, and held the title of “Assistant Minister of the Interior and Commander of the Gendarme Corps.” after 1902.
Notes[edit]

^ Words on Fire: The Unfinished Story of Yiddish; Dovid Katz; Basic Books; 2007; p. 260

References[edit]

V.I. Gurko. Features and Figures of the Past; Government and Opinion in the Reign of Nicholas II
Profiles of a Lost World: Memoirs of East European Jewish Life Before World War II; Hirsz Abramowicz, Eva Zeitlin Dobkin, Dina Abramowicz, Jeffrey Shandler, David E. Fishman, Yivo; Institute for Jewish Research; Wayne State University Press; 1999; p. 132

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Victor von Wahl.

This Russian biographical article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Mohizam Shah Dawood Shah

Mohizam Shah

Personal information

Full name
Mohizam Shah bin Dawood Shah

Date of birth
(1985-05-08) 8 May 1985 (age 31)

Place of birth
Malacca, Malaysia

Playing position
Striker

Club information

Current team

Malacca FC

Youth career

2003–2005
PKNS President’s Cup

Senior career*

Years
Team
Apps
(Gls)

2006–2009
PKNS
30
(16)

2010–2011
Sime Darby FC
24
(12)

2013
FELDA United
3
(0)

2014–
Malacca FC
0
(0)

* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 5 December 2013.
‡ National team caps and goals correct as of 5 December 2013

Mohizam Shah Dawood Shah (born 8 May 1985) is a Malaysian football player, who currently plays for Malacca FA in the FAM League .[1] His preferred position is as a striker.

Contents

1 Career
2 National team
3 References
4 External links

Career[edit]
Mohizam Shah formerly played in PKNS FC for seven years. He transferred to Sime Darby FC, at the time a club in Malaysia FAM Cup league, in 2010. He helped the club win the competition in that season, and promoted to 2011 Malaysia Premier League.[2][3] In April 2013, he joined Felda United FC.[4][5]
Mohizam also have represented Universiti Putra Malaysia in their football team, that enters in the Malaysian inter-varsity league.[6]
National team[edit]
He has been called to the Malaysia national football team in early 2006, for the friendly match against club team PDRM FA and two game friendly tour to New Zealand against New Zealand national football team.[7] He played and scored against PDRM FA,[8] however he does not play for the ‘A’-class international match against New Zealand.
He also has represented Malaysia university team in the Asean University Games 2008, held in Kuala Lumpur.[9]
References[edit]

^ http://www.felda.net.my/feldaunited/index.php/2011-08-04-23-47-02/2013-05-23-03-03-13/pemain?start=20
^ http://www.nst.com.my/nst/articles/43DARB/Article/
^ http://www.hmetro.com.my/myMetro/articles/MohizamShahtekadjulangSimeDarbyFC/Article/index_html
^ http://www.nst.com.my/sports/soccer/hope-yet-for-felda-1.271603
^ http://sports.digitalfive.com/malaysian-football/news-highlights/top-news/newsid/292153/kecederaan-effa-sentap-ceria-tganu
^ http://thestar.com.my/metro/story.asp?file=/2008/3/22/central/20667828&sec=central
^ “Soccer: Mulligan pulls out of All Whites squad”. The New Zealand Herald. 15 February 2006. Retrieved 10 September 2011. 
^ http://thestar.com.my/sports/story.
강남오피

Market governance mechanism

Part of a series on

Governance

Models

Collaborative
Good
Multistakeholder
Open-source
Private
Self

By level

Local
Global

By field

Climate
Clinical
Corporate
Data
Earth system
Ecclesiastical
Environmental
Higher education
Information
Network
Ocean
Political party
Project
Self
Service-oriented architecture
Soil
Technology
Transnational
Website

Measures

World Governance Index
Sustainable Governance Indicators

Related topics

Chief governance officer

Governance, risk management
and compliance

E-governance

Environmental, social and
corporate governance

Market governance mechanism

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Market governance mechanisms (MGMs) are formal or informal rules that have been consciously designed to change the behaviour of various economic actors – including individuals, businesses, organisations and governments – to encourage sustainable development.
Well known MGMs include fair trade certification, the European Union Emission Trading System and Payment for Ecosystem Services (PES).
MGMs, meanwhile, are not to be confused with market-based instruments, for MGMs, as a group, includes command and control regulations as well as regulatory economics. As such, MGM is a broader classification.
History[edit]
The term “market governance mechanism” was used by Baysinger and Butler in 1985 in their paper on the role of corporate law in the theory of the firm.[1] Then, Amashi et al., used the term to discuss the role of corporate social responsibility in correcting market failures.[2] And more recently, Shaping Sustainable Markets, a research initiative from the Sustainable Markets Group at the International Institute of Environment and Development, uses the term widely and have created a typology[3] to frame its work on the sustainable development impact and effectiveness of MGMs.
References[edit]

^ [1], Baysinger, B. and Butler, H. 1985. The role of corporate law in the theory of the firm. The University of Chicago.
^ [2], Amaeshi, K., Osuji, O., Doh., J. (undated) Corporate Social Responsibility as a Market Governance Mechanism: Any implications for Corporate Governance in Emerging Economies? University of Edinburgh.
^ Blackmore, Emma (May 2011). “Shaping Sustainable Markets: Research Prospectus” (PDF). International Institute for Environment and Development. Retrieved 2012-03-09. 

This economic term article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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한국야동

Garth Dennis

Garth Dennis

Birth name
Rudolph Dennis

Born
(1949-12-02) 2 December 1949 (age 67)
Jamaica

Origin
Kingston, Jamaica

Genres
Reggae

Years active
1972–present

Labels
Greensleeves, Mesa

Associated acts
Black Uhuru, The Wailing Souls

Rudolph “Garth” Dennis (born 2 December 1949) is a Jamaican musician who was a founder member of Black Uhuru, later a member of The Wailing Souls for ten years before returning to Black Uhuru in the mid-1980s, and has also recorded as a solo artist.

Contents

1 Career
2 Discography

2.1 Solo

2.1.1 Albums
2.1.2 Singles

2.2 with the Wailing Souls
2.3 with Black Uhuru

3 References

Career[edit]
Born in 1949, Dennis grew up in Kingston, Jamaica.[1] He formed Black Uhuru in 1972 with Don Carlos and Duckie Simpson.[2] After the group’s early releases Dennis left, going on to join the Wailing Souls in the mid-1970s, staying with them during their successful Channel One era.[3]
When the core members of the Wailing Souls moved back to Jamaica in 1985 after a period in the United States, Dennis stayed behind, but later returned to Jamaica to rejoin the re-formed original lineup of Black Uhuru.[4] With Black Uhuru, Dennis recorded the Grammy-nominated 1991 album Now and three further albums (along with dub versions). When Simpson left the group, Dennis and Carlos continued as Black Uhuru until December 1987, but Simpson also claimed the name, winning a legal case in 1998.[5][6]
In 2008 Dennis returned to the Wailing Souls.[7]
His first solo album, Trenchtown 19 3rd Street, which featured Sly Dunbar and Carlton “Santa” Davis, was released in February 2015.[1]
Discography[edit]
Solo[edit]
Albums[edit]

Trenchtown 19 3rd Street (2015)

Singles[edit]

“Slow Coach”, Sydna

with the Wailing Souls[edit]

Wild Suspense (1979), Mango
Wailing (1981), Jah Guidance
Fire House Rock (1981), Greensleeves
Soul & Power (1981), Studio One
Inchpinchers (1982), Greensleeves
Baby Come Rock (1983), Joe Gibbs Music
On The Rocks (1983), Greensleeves
Stranded (1984), Greensleeves

with Black Uhuru[edit]

Now (1991), Mesa/Rhino
Now Dub (1991), Mesa
Iron Storm (1992), Mesa
Iron Storm Dub (1992), Mesa
Mystical Truth (1992), Mesa
Mystical Truth Dub (1993), Mesa
Live (1993), Sonic Sounds
Strongg (1994), Mesa
Strongg Dub (1994), Mesa

References[edit]

^ a b Campbell, Howard (2015) “Garth Dennis Goes Back to Trench Town”, Jamaica Observer, 30 August 2015. Retrieved 30 August 2015
^ Moskowitz, David V. (2005) Caribbean Popular Music,

Christophe Butkens

Hatching table of Christophe Butkens (1626)

Enlarged hatching table of Butkens

Christophe Butkens (1590–1650) was a Cistercian abbot from Antwerp, a historian and a genealogist who developed a new hatching system.

Contents

1 Hatching systems
2 Works
3 References
4 See also

Hatching systems[edit]
Butkens developed his own hatching system but he himself used it in an inconsistent way, leading to misunderstandings. It quickly passed out of use in favour of other systems. His hatching method was published in the book Annales genealogiques de la maison de Lynden (Antwerp, 1626), which has been seen as flagrant in falsifying the van Lynden genealogy, as shown by Baron van Linden in 1891. However, his later work is seen as authentic. According to Philipp Spener some maintained that Butkens was the first to invent a heraldic hatching system, but others gave that honour to Marcus Vulson de la Colombière.[1]
Butkens was one of the two censors (the other being Henricus Calenus) who approved publication of Juan Caramuel Lobkowitz’s treatise Declaración Mystica de las Armas de España (Brussels, Lucas van Meerbeeck, 1636), which contains an alternative hatching system.
Works[edit]

Annales genealogiques de la maison de Lynden. Antwerp, 1626
Trophées tant sacrés que prophanes de la duché de Brabant. Tome I. Contenant l’origine, succession et descendance des ducs et princes de ceste maison avec leurs actions plus signalées, ensemble des genealogies de plusieurs ducs, princes, comtes, barons, seigneurs et nobles, leur vassals et subiects avec les preuves servantes à entiere verification…, Antwerp, 1641. Frontispiece engraved by Mathieu Borrekens after the drawing of Abraham van Diepenbeke. Another edition: F. C. Butkens, Trophées tant sacrés et profanes du Duché de Brabant. 1724-1726

References[edit]

^ “De Authore non omnes idem sentiunt: Alii Christophoro de Butkens adscribunt inventionem, qui ab anno 1626 ea usus est, alii M Vulsonio de la Colombiere hoc honoris tributum malunt.” Insignium theoria: seu operis heraldici pars generalis, vol. 1, second edition, Frankfurt, 1735, p. 113.

See also[edit]

Hatching system
Jan Baptist Zangrius
Thomas de Rouck

Chatroom (film)

Not to be confused with Chat Room (film).

Chatroom

Theatrical release poster

Directed by
Hideo Nakata

Produced by

Laura Hastings-Smith
Alison Owen

Written by
Enda Walsh

Starring

Aaron Johnson
Hannah Murray
Imogen Poots
Matthew Beard
Daniel Kaluuya

Music by
Kenji Kawai

Cinematography
Benoît Delhomme

Edited by
Masahiro Hirakubo

Production
company

Ruby Films

Distributed by
Pathé

Release date

14 May 2010 (2010-05-14) (Cannes)
22 December 2010 (2010-12-22) (UK)

Running time

97 minutes[1]

Country
United Kingdom

Language
English

Chatroom is a 2010 British drama thriller film directed by Hideo Nakata[2] about five teenagers who meet on the internet and encourage each other’s bad behaviour. The film is based on the play Chatroom by Enda Walsh.[3]

Contents

1 Plot
2 Cast
3 Production
4 Release

4.1 Critical reception

5 References
6 External links

Plot[edit]
William Collins (Aaron Johnson) is a depressed teen recovering from self-harm and regularly goes online to chat rooms. One day, he decides to open a chat room himself and calls it “Chelsea Teens!” and where he meets Jim (Matthew Beard), another kid; Eva (Imogen Poots), a model; Emily (Hannah Murray), a goody two-shoes; and Mo (Daniel Kaluuya), a normal kid. There is no real subject matter in “Chelsea Teens!” which instead focuses on the lives of each teen as they talk. Even though they only really communicate through text, the film depicts them in an old hotel-like room and actually having contact.
William is a loner who lives with his parents (Megan Dodds and Nicholas Gleaves). He hates both his parents, blaming them for his past, and lives his entire life on the internet. Jim is another loner who is suffering from depression following his father leaving him and his mother. Eva is constantly made fun of by her co-workers about her appearance. Emily feels distant from her parents and does not feel like she gets enough attention. Mo thinks he is a pedophile because he is attracted to his friend’s prepubescent sister, Keisha (Rebecca McLintock). William sees it to himself to help them in a crude manner. He Photoshops embarrassing pictures of Eva’s co-worker and posts them online. He convinces Jim to flush down his anti-depressants to make himself feel more relaxed and to reveal his face behind the depressants, his true identity. He tells Emily to do some dirty work, teaming up with Eva. They come up with ways in

Dancing the Code

Dancing the Code

Cover Art

Author
Paul Leonard

Series
Doctor Who book:
Virgin Missing Adventures

Release number

9

Subject
Featuring:
Third Doctor
Jo, UNIT

Set in
Period between
Catastrophea and Speed of Flight[1][2]

Publisher
Virgin Books

Publication date

April 1995

Pages
279

ISBN
0-426-20441-7

Preceded by
Time of Your Life

Followed by
The Menagerie

Dancing the Code is an original novel written by Paul Leonard and based on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. It features the Third Doctor, Jo and UNIT. It takes place before the Virgin Missing Adventure Speed of Flight, also by Paul Leonard.

Contents

1 Plot
2 References
3 External links

3.1 Reviews

Plot[edit]
The Doctor has built a machine designed to predict the future, and it shows the Brigadier murdering him and Jo. Unable to tell when this is destined to occur, the Doctor and Jo decide to stay apart. Jo is sent to the war-ravaged Arab nation of Kebiria, but upon arrival, she is immediately arrested and sent to a brutal political prison. And that’s not all: deep in the North African desert, an alien infestation is rapidly growing and threatens to overrun the entire planet.
References[edit]

^ The Doctor’s Timeline at The Whoniverse gives support for specific placement relative to other spin-off media.
^ Placement between Planet of the Daleks and The Green Death confirmed by cover blurb.

External links[edit]

Dancing the Code at the Doctor Who Reference Guide
The Cloister Library – Dancing the Code
Dancing the Code at The TARDIS Library

Reviews[edit]

Dancing the Code reviews at Outpost Gallifrey (Archived)
Dancing the Code reviews at The Doctor Who Ratings Guide

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Virgin Missing Adventures

First Doctor

Venusian Lullaby
The Sorcerer’s Apprentice
The Empire of Glass
The Man in the Velvet Mask
The Plotters

Second Doctor

The Menagerie
Invasion of the Cat-People
Twilight of the Gods
The Dark Path

Third Doctor

The Ghosts of N-Space
Dancing the Code
The Eye of the Giant
The Scales of Injustice
Speed of Flight

Fourth Doctor

Evolution
The Romance of Crime
System Shock
Managra
The English Way of Death
The Shadow of Weng-Chiang
A Device of Death
The Well-Mannered War

Fifth Doctor

Goth Opera
The Crystal Bucephalus
Lords of the Storm
The Sands of Time
Cold Fusion

Sixth Doctor

State of Change
Time of Your Life
Millennial Rites
Killing Ground
Burning
수원오피

USS Nicholas

For ships with a similar name, see USS Nicholson.

USS Nicholas may refer to:

USS Nicholas (DD-311) was a Clemson-class destroyer, launched in 1919 and one of seven destroyers lost in the Honda Point Disaster on 8 September 1923
USS Nicholas (DD-449) was a Fletcher-class destroyer, launched in 1942 and struck in 1970
USS Nicholas (FFG-47) is an Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigate, launched in 1983 and decommissioned in 2014

This article includes a list of ships with the same or similar names. If an internal link for a specific ship led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended ship article, if one exists.

Krushelnytsya

Krushelnytsya
Крушельниця

Town

Krushelnytsya

Coordinates: 49°06′16″N 23°29′10″E / 49.10444°N 23.48611°E / 49.10444; 23.48611Coordinates: 49°06′16″N 23°29′10″E / 49.10444°N 23.48611°E / 49.10444; 23.48611

Country
 Ukraine

Province
 Lviv Oblast

District
Skole Raion

Established
1395

Area

 • Total
2,42 km2 (93 sq mi)

Elevation/(average value of)
417 m (1,368 ft)

Population

 • Total
1,297

 • Density
535,95/km2 (138,810/sq mi)

Time zone
EET (UTC+2)

 • Summer (DST)
EEST (UTC+3)

Postal code
82617

Area code
+380 3251

Website
село Крушельниця (Ukrainian)

Krushelnytsya (Ukrainian: Крушельни́ця) – village (selo) in Skole Raion, Lviv Oblast, of Western Ukraine.
Area of the village totals is 2,42 km2 and the population of the village is about 1297 people. Local government is administered by Krushelnytsya village council.[1]

Contents

1 Geography
2 History
3 Cult constructions and religion
4 References
5 External links

Geography[edit]
Krushelnytsya village is located in Skole district, on the banks of two mountain rivers – the Stryi River and Krushelnytsya River.
The village is located along the way Verkhnie Synovydne – Skhidnytsia at a distance 108 kilometres (67 mi) from the regional center of Lviv, 14 kilometres (8.7 mi) from the district center Skole, and 9 kilometres (5.6 mi) from Verkhnie Synovydne.
History[edit]
The first written mention of the village dates back to the year 1395[2] October 4, 1395 Władysław II Jagiełło, King of Poland, granted for John and Demyan village Krushelnytsya in Tustan parish.[3]
Cult constructions and religion[edit]
The village has an architectural monuments of Cultural Heritage of Skole Raion in Ukraine:

Church of the Holy Trinity (wooden), built in 1842 (N – 1414/1).
Belfry Church of the Holy Trinity (wooden) (N – 1414/2).[4]

There are in the village wooden church of St. Nicholas, built in 1822.[5]
References[edit]

^ Крушельницька сільська рада (Ukrainian)
^ Село Крушельниця: карта вулиць (Ukrainian)
^ Перші документальні згадки про перемишльські роди гербу Сас (XIV—XVII ст.) (a paragraph 39) (Ukrainian)
^ Пам’ятки архітектури Сколівськог
BJ야동

Invasive lobular carcinoma

Invasive lobular carcinoma

Invasive lobular carcinoma demonstrating a predominantly lobular growth pattern

Classification and external resources

ICD-O
M8520/3

[edit on Wikidata]

Lobular breast cancer. Single file cells and cell nests.

Invasive lobular carcinoma accounts for 5-10% of invasive breast cancer.[1][2]
The histologic patterns include:[3][4][5]

Type
Prevalence
Description

Classical
40%
round or ovoid cells with little cytoplasm in a single-file infiltrating pattern, sometimes concentrically giving a targetoid pattern

Alveolar
5%
Aggregates of classical-appearing cells

Solid
10%
Sheets of classical-appearing cells with little intervening stroma

Tubulolobular
5%
Cells form microtubules in >90% of tumor (smaller than in tubular carcinoma)

Pleomorphic

Classical-appearing but with pleomorphic cells

Mixed
40%
No dominant pattern

Overall, the five-year survival rate of invasive lobular carcinoma was approximately 85% in 2003.[6]
Loss of E-cadherin is common in lobular carcinoma but is also seen in other breast cancers.[7]
Treatment includes surgery and adjuvant therapy.
References[edit]

^ Pointon KS, Cunningham DA (August 1999). “Ultrasound findings in pure invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast: comparison with matched cases of invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast”. Breast. 8 (4): 188–90. doi:10.1054/brst.1999.0042. PMID 14731438. 
^ Boughey JC, Wagner J, Garrett BJ, et al. (March 2009). “Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Invasive Lobular Carcinoma May Not Improve Rates of Breast Conservation”. Ann. Surg. Oncol. 16 (6): 1606–11. doi:10.1245/s10434-009-0402-z. PMID 19280264. 
^ Moore MM, Borossa G, Imbrie JZ, et al. (June 2000). “Association of Infiltrating Lobular Carcinoma With Positive Surgical Margins After Breast-Conservation Therapy”. Ann. Surg. 231 (6): 877–82. doi:10.1097/00000658-200006000-00012. PMC 1421077. PMID 10816631. 
^ Spencer JT, Shutter J (March 2009). “Synchronous bilateral invasive lobular breast cancer presenting as carcinomatosis in a male”. Am. J. Surg. Pathol. 33 (3): 470–4. doi:10.1097/PAS.0b013e318190d10d. PMID 19092630. 
^ Fletcher’s diagnostic histopathology of tumors. 3rd Ed. p. 931-932.
^ Arpino G, Bardou VJ, Clark GM, Elledge RM (2004). “Infiltrating lobular carcinoma of the breast: tumor characteristics and clinical outcome”. Breast Cancer Res. 6 (3): R149–56. doi:10.1186/bcr767. PMC 400666. PMID 15084238. 
^